Top Secret: China’s Plans to Control the Weather

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Rain on demand?

Imagine if you had a TiVo for the weather: it would rain when you wanted it to rain and snow when you wanted it to snow.

If you were a farmer, surely you could arrange for healthy and hale crops year-round.

As a parent, you could summon up a breeze when your son or daughter wanted to fly a kite.

If you’re a friend of fair weather, you could have nothing but sunshine all the time. (Or you could just move to Southern California.)

And if you’re a government, well, the possibilities for creativity with the weather are potentially endless.

In some governments’ hands, one imagines their exploitation of weather control would be relatively harmless: if a country such as England gained the ability to control the weather they’d trade their year-round fog and overcast skies for a bit more sun (but not too much, due to their steady habits, you know). On the other hand, France would surely manipulate the weather to make their wine regions more fertile and produce evermore premium grapes.

And then there’s China. No technology is safe in China’s hands. The announcement that China is rolling out a weather modification system should send a shiver down your spine.

The communist Chinese government announced it plans to drastically increase its use of technology to artificially change the weather.

China has used cloud-seeding technology for decades, a technology that involves blasting silver molecules into the sky to initiate condensation and cloud formation.

Now, however, China plans to increase the size of its weather modification program to 5.5 square miles by 2025, which is an area of land that is the size of India.

For anyone that thinks the weather in China doesn’t affect us here in the United States, consider how air pollution from Beijing travels across the Pacific and spoils our air.

President Trump is right to call out the hypocrisy of radical climate leftists in the U.S. like Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez who want to ban airplanes and hamburgers and adopt the Green New Deal to reduce carbon emissions. The number one polluters on the planet are China and India and the air we breathe, along with the weather, knows no state boundaries.

China’s attempts to control and manipulate the weather could dramatically affect the global environment on an epic scale and even spark wars with neighboring countries.

China’s neighbor India is one country concerned about these developments. India’s population of 1.3 billion relies on its massive agriculture sector for nourishment. China could effectively starve India to death by decreasing the amount of rain India receives or the amount of snowfall in the Himalayas which feed India’s rivers in the spring.

India’s crops rely on a monsoon season that’s already unpredictable due to increasingly erratic changes in weather patterns.

“Lack of proper coordination of weather modification activity (could) lead to charges of ‘rain stealing’ between neighboring regions,” National Taiwan University researchers conclude in a 2017 paper published in Geoforum.

Think it can’t happen?

China has a proven track record of manipulating the weather to its advantage. In 2008, China used weather modification tech to seed clouds ahead of the 2008 Olympics and political meetings. This caused it to rain ahead of these events leaving the events with clear skies and undisturbed by the weather.

An arms race in weather manipulation is something no one should want, but it may be where we’re headed. Imagine bad actors such as China using weather modification to create lightning storms over opposing armies or start hurricanes to decimate another country’s cities.

Those God-like powers are a ways off from the technology of cloud-seeding, which has up until now been used primarily to aid farmlands suffering drought.

In the meantime, China’s planned expansion of weather modification may do more than seed rain countries and instead seed international conflict in addition to clouds.