COVID and Drugs are on the Menu as Students Head Back to School

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As if students returning to school didn’t have enough to worry about, there’s COVID-19. Depending on where a student goes to school, they might be forced to wear a mask…or they may have to show proof of vaccination. Though, there are also plenty of schools that aren’t requiring either.

COVID isn’t even the biggest issue at the moment. Drugs are hitting more and more schools – and parents are being warned to talk to their kids about fake prescription drugs that are being marketed to them.

Drug trafficking has seen an uptick since the beginning of the year – and there are a few reasons for that. Liberal cities have closed so much down that people have sought alternative income streams, including those that aren’t legal. Additionally, with all of the drug traffickers coming in from the southern border, many have decided to move different forms of merchandise.

As such, counterfeit prescription pills seem to be spilling out into the streets and overflowing into schools. They’re being targeted on the streets and on social media.

The crazy thing is that many of these counterfeit pills look like the real thing. They’re in bright colors and shapes so that students think that they’re buying such things as those that treat insomnia, narcolepsy, pain, and depression.

The pills are laced with a dangerous substance – fentanyl. It’s a deadly synthetic opioid that has caused an epidemic all over the U.S. for quite a few years. While there are plenty of major cities with the problem, it’s showing up in a number of Texas towns that aren’t too far from the border.

San Antonio is one of the latest cities to see counterfeit prescription pills. According to Bexar County Sheriff Javier Salazar, “In fact, I’m being told it’s the largest fentanyl seizure in the history of Bexar County.”

Well, that makes it a lot more difficult to send kids back to school. Now, it’s no longer about warning about social distancing. It’s also warning them not to buy what appears to be prescription drugs from people.

A raid that took place at a Best Western in San Antonio resulted in 75,000 pills being found, which totals an estimated $1.1 million all containing fentanyl.

According to the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), 93,000 people overdosed on counterfeit pills in 2020. There’s a real fear that the number will be going up dramatically – especially as more drug trafficking organizations are hitting school-aged kids that don’t know any better.

At least with COVID, there are ways to prevent it. Wash your hands, sanitize, and social distance. With fentanyl, it can lead to a drug overdose on the very first pill. They go by nicknames like M-boxes, Mexican Blues, or just Blues. As assistant special agent Dante Sorianello of the DEA in San Antonio explains, “taking them is a game of Russian Roulette with your life.”

This is just what every parent wants to hear. Sending their kids to school in Biden’s American really is a gamble. And yet, there are actually people in this country that believe he’s doing a great job. Perhaps if we keep the southern border open long enough, COVID and drugs will be available at every school in the nation.